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With Reuben Goossens

Maritime Historian, Cruise‘n’Ship Reviewer

Author and Maritime Lecturer

 

 

PLEASE NOTE: Most images on this page, except those marked otherwise, are from the author’s private collection

Including from an excellent brochure in his possession!

Introduction:

Lloyd Triestino Lines re-established their Australian services with a 1924 German built ship the SS Saarbrucken that had been obtained by them in 1937 and had been renamed the Toscana. Although having operated on various services the 9,429 GRT (Gross Registered Tons) SS Toscana commenced a new career as she departed Genoa on October 19, 1948 for her very first voyage to Australia, arriving in Melbourne on November 30, and Sydney on December 2.

SS Toscana seen on her way to Australia

However, Lloyd Triestino realised that they required new and modern ships on the popular service to Australia as the migrant and the tourist passenger service, as well as transporting cargo was in need for superior ships! Thus they had their designers busy with plans that would eventually realise some seven ordered excellent and almost identical looking ships! Being extremely happy with the design and functionality of their larger Australian ships, and the slightly smaller four ships, they signed the contracts with the builders for their Australia class trio being their very first post war newly built liners!

The very first artist impression how the new MS Australia trio would look like

 

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Part One – The Australia Class Trio:

The new Lloyd Triestino ships were launched in the following order and we also see their GRT - Gross Registered Tonnage and their proposed services:

1. Australia: May 21, 1950 – 12,839 GRT - Australia service.

2. Oceania: July 30, 1950 – 12,839 GRT - Australia service.

3. Neptunia: October 1, 1951 – 12,838 GRT - Australia service.

 

These were followed by the slightly smaller …

 

Africa - January 24, 1951 – 11,427 GRT – Far East service.

Victoria - September 18, 1951 – 11,695 GRT – Far East service.

Europa - October 21, 1951 – 11,430 GRT – East & South Africa service.

Asia - October 28, 1951 – 11,693East & South Africa service.

MS Australia and her two sisters looked as modern as tomorrow with their gleaming white hulls and superstructure, beautifully set off by a blue ribbon just below Upper Deck and located at the bow being the company’s logo! Their short but shapely and stylised funnel were yellow and topped with a blue hat with a single thin blue stripe close to the top, being the traditional Lloyd Triestino colours. Being Cargo Passenger liners, they had three holds forward and two aft, which were serviced by four white kingposts with the relevant derricks forward, but just two kingposts and derricks aft.

The front cover of a booklet I own full of B&W interior photographs seen on this page

It was published in 1951 – The deck plan I have is also from this publication

I have added a small additional plan showing the new Tourist Class lounge

Atop, but slightly set back of the bridge, was a tripod style radar mast with a traditional lookout (as you can see from the booklet above). The mast did not just look attractive but it suited these ships perfectly! Thus the overall impression being when anyone saw one of these delightful Italian liners was always one of pure delight.

I recall, when one sailed up the Sydney harbour and we first saw that beautiful shapely curved white bow and then her perfect balance in design, with that superstructure set not forward or even amidships, but just slightly back, that gave the appearance that they had such long bows, thus a far more stylistic and fast appearance. And as she passed the picture was completed by that delightful stern. But sadly, such a wonderful sights we will never ever see again, but the memories will last forever, and it is my intention to keep them alive with these pages!

I always felt that these Passenger Cargo liners were close to the best designed and balanced ships of their time. However, there are two other ships I know that would just beat them, and they are the superbly stylish and long lasting ships that became lovingly known in Australia as the “Elegant White Yachts” the MS Tjiluwah and Tjiwangi of the Royal Interocean Lines. However, that takes nothing away from the delightful lines of the Australia trio!

However, the exterior had nothing on what the interiors offered for that is what would make this trio popular so rapidly!

Part Two – MS Australia:

The Australia was launched by her builders Cantieri Reuniti dell’Adriatico Shipyards at Yard number 1758, on May 21, 1950 with a great number of dignitaries present, from Lloyd Triestino, the government and many from high other high ranking families, for obviously this was a big event for the company, being the very first Italian liner built specially for Lloyd Triestino after the WWII!

There are big crowds awaiting the ship to come down the slipway!

Although the MS Australia was the first of the trio to be completed in April 1951, she was followed rapidly by Oceania just a month later, but we will come to her later!

With the first of their post war liners ready, Lloyd Triestino’s MS Australia departed on her maiden voyage from Trieste bound for Sydney Australia on April 19, 1951, and she arrived in Fremantle (Perth) on May 11, then continued to Adelaide arriving on May 15, she then arrived in Melbourne on May 17, where she remained there for three days and departed on the 19th.arriving in Sydney on May 22, but just this time she continued to Brisbane sailing along the Brisbane river to the Hamilton wharves on May 24 where she ended her successful maiden voyage. She returned to Italy, not to Trieste, but to her home port Genoa and she would based here on depart from there!

Her and her sister’s itinerary in general was as follows: Genoa, Naples, Messina, Port Said, Suez, Colombo, Djakarta, Fremantle, Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide, Fremantle, Djakarta, Singapore, Colombo, Cochin, Aden, Suez, Port Said, Messina, Naples to Genoa. There were changes later, but that was her original schedule.

 

Above & below: An information leaflet given to passengers prior to departure. Issued in 1952

 

MS Australia proved to be very successful as would be her two sisters, for these modern and reliable ships were much needed and the company was able to once again provide a regular schedule of modern liners on the Australia service.

Let us now look at the First Class facilities:

Please Note: The layout was identical for all three ships, the only difference being was the décor on each ship and I will be showing the relevant images I have available for each ship under their own history and photo album.

I will commence topside on Bridge deck where there was ample space for sports beside and aft of the funnel.

Heading a deck down, Sun Deck far forward located on port side was the only internal passenger venue, the ever popular Card and Games Room and just aft of the Children’s Room, which was well insulated I have been advised! There was nothing between this the delightful Veranda Bar, which was fully covered and at the sides enclosed with large windows providing a great view of the ocean, but it was open aft, thus  overlooking the pool and the Tourist Class Games Deck. This area had ample table and chairs and was a popular spot day and night. Surrounding the pool there were ample deckchairs for those who desired to soak up the sun!

Next was Promenade Deck, which featured a wonderful promenade for walking, although it was not a complete walk-around, but at least a 90% one! Inside located far forward was the only First Class venue the magnificently appointed Main Lounge, and it has some entrance considering it had a ship wide glass wall and doors from the lobby. In those days vinyl flooring had become the rage, and the same applied here. The Lounge has a round dance floor with a band stand and seating was pleasantly arranged. On the Starboard side of the lounge going aft, thus running beside the lobby, was the intimate and beautifully decorated Bar. Overall this venue made quite an impression as you arrived. Although each ship had the identical layout, but were they were blessed with their own décor. Just aft on the port side was the Radio Room (station).

The Main Lounge seen from the lobby

The next deck down was Upper Deck and for the first time we have reached the First Class accommodations.

First Class Accommodation details: Many cabins have either just two lower beds, or two lower beds and one or two upper foldaway berths, thus these cabins can be sold as a twin, three, or a four berth cabin. A special feature in First Class cabins on Upper and A decks is that one of the lower beds is a comfortable settee, that fold down and becomes a proper bed at night. But during the day, the room takes on the feel of a day delightful room. Available were twin bedded cabins with private facilities as well as three berth cabins with private facilities, all having a shower. However, there were also cabins that had a shared bathroom located between two cabins with some would have a full bath, whilst others a shower. In addition to the aforementioned, there were also two inside single cabins on Upper deck both having a basin and a shower, but the WC being directly outside their doors. For those who had a shower in their bathrooms, there were ample baths available on each deck.

Located aft on Upper Deck is the aft lobby, and the Writing Room on the port side, and on the starboard side the Ladies Room, but later it became the library. Next stretching right across the ship was the spacious Main Dining Room that served some excellent meals in this delightful venue throughout the voyage.

The First Class Entrance Hall and Main Lobby with the Front Desk & Pursers Office

We now come to A Deck and there we find the stylish Main Lobby, the Front Deck, the Maitre ‘Hotel’s and the Chief Pursers office. There is also the ladies Hairdresser on the starboard side. In the forward section there are nine First class cabins that have private facilities, be it with a shower or a bath. However, most cabins aft of the lobby have share facilities between two cabins.

Next we turn to the Second Class facilities:

Obviously we will understand that all facilities are towards aft of the ship. On Promenade Deck located atop of the Second Class Veranda Bar was the spacious Games Deck that had facilities for a good variety of games, as well as sun baking for those who decide they needed it when it was quiet up there!

Upper Deck offered an excellent promenade deck for walking, but of course at the most forward part is the Lido Terrace and swimming pool, directly followed by the very popular Veranda Bar and lounge that was great inside as well as o the terrace outside aft overlooking the stern!

Lido Bar and Pool

 

Veranda Bar and Lounge

A Deck offered one two berth cabin with private facilities, and the rest were four berth cabins, that could be sold as two three or four berths of course, but all of these had share bathroom between two cabins. Aft of the accommodations was the very large Dining Room, which was followed by the lobby, with the Writing Room of the port side and the children Play Room starboard. Next is the spacious Second Class Main lounge and the main venue for dancing and entertainment!

Here we see a typical four berth cabin with a shared bathroom that has a door into two cabins

 

The Writing Room

B Deck has many cabins on the starboard side from two to four berth and all having those shared facilities between the two cabins, which seemed to be the thing on these ships, but obviously more economical and making them more available to all passengers, rather than having to queue up in those public bathrooms outside! On the port side there are just five cabins aft, all four berth none having private facilities. Forward on port side there was the ships surgery, doctor’s office, whilst aft near the main Second Class Lobby was also the all important Emigration Office, as most people travelling from Europe to Australia would be migrants. At the Lobby, also being the entrance Hall was the Pursers Office and the Hairdresser just aft. There were more cabins aft, including some very small two berth cabins, the rest mostly four berth, but only a few with shared facilities.

Main Lobby and the Pursers Office

The stairs down to the dormitories on Deck C are beside the passages forward and aft.

Third Class:

Passengers in this class would share the overall facilities of Second Class that is the deck spaces and Lounges as well as the Dining Room. The main difference being was their sleeping arrangements!

Deck C: Those in Third Class would either need to use the down stairs located port and starboard sides at the Second Class Main Lobby on B Deck, pending on which sex you are either forward or aft of the lobby to reach the four main aft compartments that contains a series of dormitories. However, others would need to walk on the starboard side of B Deck as far forward as was possible to the two down staircases, pending on their sex and head down to the very large dormitories down on Deck C. All the dormitories had ample bathrooms and WC’s available to them close by.

Here we see a typical dormitory, yet this is one of the smaller ones

 

In 1956 with the closure of the Suez Canal, the ships were rerouted via South Africa until the Suez was opened again in April 1957, great for the passengers and sightseeing, but costly otherwise!

The 1958 Refit:

In 1958 the Australia was returned to Italy for an extensive refit and a partial rebuild, which saw her forward shelter deck (A Deck) built in and there at hold number 2, a spacious new Tourist Class lounge was installed. Changes were also made to the accommodations, as now she would accommodate just 136 First Class, 304 Tourist Class A and 232 Tourist  Class B.

The difference between Tourist A & B was that passengers in Tourist A were accommodated in cabins, from two to four berth, whilst those in Tourist B were accommodated in the various Dormitories on C Deck aft and forward of the ship, just like Third Class used to be, but now it had a name change and the dormitories had been reduced in size. Thus considerable work was undertaken with her accommodations as well as a new lounge! In addition the ship received a good freshen up and upon completion she was 13,140 GRT.

There is a 1951 MS Australia Oceania Neptunia Deck Plan available at the bottom of the page

Included are sections of Deck Plans showing the new Tourist Class Lounge located forward on A Deck after 1958 as well as the changes on C Deck!

 

Here we see an image of the Australia after she had been refitted and rebuilt with her shelter deck filled in and a lounge added

 

Advertising the rebuilt and more “modern looking” Australia Class trio

As is obvious from the above passenger numbers, First Class numbers had already been dwindling, thus the increase in Tourist Class and the additional lounge providing better facilities! Also, Lloyd Triestino was now marketing more and more to the younger tourist market, as well as to families going home to Italy and back, or families vesting their relatives in Australia, etc. And most of these would travel in Tourist Class!

She continued sailing and proved to be extremely popular with excellent loadings, which had Lloyd Triestino decide in 1960 to build two larger ships the Galileo and Marconi that would enter into service in 1963, thus the time for the Australia trio would end.

The wonderful MS Australia was the very first to be withdrawn from her Australian duties as she departed Genoa for her very last voyage on January 18, 1963. Having arrived at Sydney, she made a sad farewell as she departed on February 21 and many came to wave her off. On her way home to Italy she called on the following Australian ports; Hobart on February 23, then Melbourne, Adelaide and Fremantle from where she departed Australia for the very last time on March 4 for Genoa!

MS Australia departs Melbourne for the final time in 1963 bound for Genoa to become the Italia Line’s MS Donizetti

Photograph by Peter Plowman – from the Rich Turnwald collection

A New Name and Service:

Upon arrival in Genoa and having unloaded, she was handed over to the Italia Line who renamed her Donizetti. She was given yet another refit and made ready for her new role operating the companies Genoa to Central America service. Upon completion she was register as being 13,226 GRT. MS Donizetti departed Genoa for her first voyage to Valparaiso on June 4, 1963. This service continued for a good thirteen years, however, like as with all passengers services air travel was making inroads as the Boeing 747 introduced cheaper fares and obviously speed, but another major factor was the introduction of containerisation, on these ships were simply not suited as modern cargo ships anymore, thus 1976 would see her sail on her final voyage ever!

Here we see the Italia Line ship, the MS Donizetti, ex Australia

Thus tragically, in July1976, the beautiful MS Donizetti, ex Australia was withdrawn from service and she was first of the trio to be laid up at Genoa. She was later moved to La Spezia. Then, on July 4, 1977 she was moved to “Cantieri Navali del Golfo” at La Spezia where she breaking up commenced immediately. She would soon be followed by her sisters!

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Part Three – MS Oceania:

Like the Australia, the Oceania the second of the series, was also built by the Cantieri Reuniti dell’Adriatico Shipyards in Trieste, but in Yard number 1759. She was launched on July 30, 1950 and completed and delivered to Lloyd Triestino in August 1951.

MS Oceania see as built with her shelter deck stiil open, which was used as a Third Class Promenade Deck having a Bar there as seen on the deck plan

Photographer unknown – *Please see the photo notes at the bottom of the page

She departed on her maiden voyage from Genoa on August 18, 1951 and headed via the same route as shown above in the MS Australia section. Like her sister she was very popular and was usually fully booked.

MS Oceania Photo Album

 

1: First Class

 

The Restaurant

 

Main Lobby and entrance to the ship

 

Lido Bar and Pool

 

Typical twin bedded cabin, the bed at the end converts to a settee

 

MS Oceania seen arriving in Melbourne in 1951

 

2: Second Class

 

Here we see the Main Lounge which was reasonably similar on all ships

 

Children’s Play Room

 

A four berth cabin

In 1956 with the closure of the Suez Canal, the ships were rerouted via South Africa until the Suez was opened again in April 1957, great for the passengers and sightseeing, but costly otherwise!

The 1958 Refit:

In 1958 the Australia was returned to Italy for an extensive refit and a partial rebuild, which saw her forward shelter deck (A Deck) built in and there at hold number 2, a spacious new Tourist Class lounge was installed. Changes were also made to the accommodations, as now she would accommodate just 136 First Class, 304 Tourist Class A and 232 Tourist  Class B.

The difference between Tourist A & B was that passengers in Tourist A were accommodated in cabins, from two to four berth, whilst those in Tourist B were accommodated in the various Dormitories on C Deck aft and forward of the ship, just like Third Class used to be, but now it had a name change and the dormitories had been reduced in size. Thus considerable work was undertaken with her accommodations as well as a new lounge! In addition the ship received a good freshen up and upon completion she was 13,140 GRT.

There is a 1951 MS Australia Oceania Neptunia Deck Plan available at the bottom of the page

Included are sections of Deck Plans showing the new Tourist Class Lounge located forward on A Deck after 1958 as well as the changes on C Deck!

 

The refitted and rebuilt Oceania – Note the 8 small portholes under the forward Kingposts

You will note that there are a series of four twin portholes located in the upper hull, being the new lounge

Photographer unknown – *Please see the photo notes at the bottom of the page

She returned and her tourist class proved to be very successful and business was very good for a while, but the modern age caught up with the Jet age as well as containerisation and slowly Lloyd Triestino knew it was time to remove her from the very long services!

A New Name and Service:

MS Oceania departed Genoa for her last voyage to Sydney on February 15, 1963, arriving there on March 23. Upon her return to Italia, like her sister Australia before her to operate the Genoa, Central South America services. Thus she was handed over to Italia Line and was renamed; Verdi. With the MS Verdi having received a refit and other minor alterations she was registered at 13,226 GRT

Here we see the MS Verdi, ex Oceania

Photographer unknown – *Please see the photo notes at the bottom of the page

However, just within a few months this fine ship encountered her very first ever accident since 1951. It would be on April 16, 1964, when the Verdi collided with another ship in fog not far from Gibraltar. The other ship was a tanker named the Pentelikon. MS Verdi suffered damage to her bow and thus she had to return to Genoa for repairs.

The Verdi returned to her Genoa to Central South America services and continued this service successfully until July 1976, when she was withdrawn from service and laid up at Genoa. Then on June 23, 1977 she arrived at the “Cantieri Navali del Golfo” yard at La Spezia where she was duly broken up.

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Part Four – MS Neptunia:

MS Neptunia the third and last ship of the trio to be built by Cantieri Reuniti dell’Adriatico Shipyards at Trieste, Italy at Yard 1760, and she was launched on October 1, 1950. She was completed in September 1951. The gleaming white Neptunia completed was ready for her maiden voyage with a full complement on September 14, 1951, as she headed for Sydney Australia and completed her journey in Brisbane on October18. With the Neptunia having commenced in service Lloyd Triestino finally had three fine fast liners in service transporting passengers as well as cargo, and better still, loadings were even better than was expected! This continued for the next decade and the company was happy with its profitability!

Here we see the Neptunia in her early days with her shelter deck still in place, that would later be built in to become a lounge

 

MS Neptunia Photo Album

 

1: First Class

 

The Main Lounge and Bar - forward on Promenade Deck

 

The Veranda Bar forward of the Pool – aft on Sun Deck

 

The most attractive Dining Room - aft of First Class on Upper Deck

 

Children’s Play Room – forward on Sun Deck

 

A single or two bed cabin, the settee converts to a bed and the other bed folds down from the wall

See the next photograph!

 

This is a similar cabin to the above

 

The Ladies hairdresser – near the Main Lobby

In 1956 with the closure of the Suez Canal, she was rerouted via South Africa until the Suez was opened again in April 1957.

The 1958 Refit:

In 1958 the Neptunia was returned to Italy for an extensive refit and a partial rebuild, which saw her forward shelter deck (A Deck) built in and there at hold number 2, a spacious new Tourist Class lounge was installed. Changes were also made to the accommodations, as now she would accommodate just 136 First Class, 304 Tourist Class A and 232 Tourist  Class B.

Like on the other two ships, the difference between Tourist A & B was that passengers in Tourist A were accommodated in cabins, from two to four berth, whilst those in Tourist B were accommodated in the various Dormitories on C Deck aft and forward of the ship, just like Third Class used to be, but now it had a name change and the dormitories had been reduced in size. Thus considerable work was undertaken with her accommodations as well as a new lounge! In addition the ship received a good freshen up and upon completion she was 13,141 GRT

There is a 1951 MS Australia Oceania Neptunia Deck Plan available at the bottom of the page

Included are sections of Deck Plans showing the new Tourist Class Lounge located forward on A Deck after 1958 as well as the changes on C Deck!

 

The Neptunia certainly looked an absolute delight when she was completed!

Note the five sets of double portholes located forward of the superstructure where the shelter deck used to be

Photograph by Ted Scull from the Rich Turnwald collection

As she retuned to service like her sisters her passenger numbers improved greatly and she was a great success once again, but as time passed, she like every other passenger liner in the world and she was hit by the very same problems, being airlines, and if a liner was also reliant on carrying cargo, the container trade had taken over the vast majority of the work, thus holds combined with kingposts and derricks were out of date! And the Neptunia could neither fly nor carry containers, thus she needed another job!

Neptunia is seen during her last days as a Lloyd Triestino ship

It was in April 1963 that the first of the brand new large and grand Lloyd Triestino liners entered service, being the excellent Galileo Galilei, whilst her sister the Marconi had been delayed. This was good for the Neptunia as this extended her service for a just little longer on the Australia service and she sailed on until her last departure fro Genoa on August 1, 1963, bound for Sydney where she departed on September 11.

A New Name and Service:

Upon her return to Genoa, just like the Australia, she was also transferred to the Italia Line to operate the Genoa to Central America service and they renamed her; Rossini, then she received a refit, achieving a tonnage of 13,225 GRT, and commenced on her new service.

The Italia Line MS Rossini sets sail

However the Rossini, just like the Verdi and Donizetti would all become obsolete and were to be withdrawn from service. Both the Donizetti and the Verdi were the first to be laid up at Genoa in July 1976; they were followed by the Rossini just a month later in August 1976.

A photograph of the MS Rossini seen laid up and close to her final days!

Photographer unknown – *Please see the photo notes at the bottom of the page

Having been laid up at Genoa, but on June 23, 1977 the MS Rossini the superb ex Neptunia arrived together with her sister the Verdi at the “Cantieri Navali del Golfo” yards at La Spezia where breaking up commenced without delay! Strangely enough it was the first of the trio to be built just happened to be the last to arrive at the breakers yard, some twelve days later on July 4, 1977. It was the end of a great era of shipping, as from here the new great and big liners took over, but even they would become out dated fairly rapidly as passengers shipping fell into decline.

But then suddenly the cruise industry recommenced the greatest resurgence in shipping and today there ate more passenger ships at sea today, with a greater number of berths on the water in one day, than there has been throughout every generation counting back from the 1980s! However, some of the new ships are far from being attractive to look at, they are more like big square apartment (Condo’s) blocks, and inside, more like shopping malls, with countless optional dinning venues and hard sell wherever you go! For me that is not a leisurely cruise vacation, but that is the American influence of the modern world! Yet, there are still fine cruise lines around and as the author is also a cruise and a ship reviewer and still continues this on www.cruise-australia.com, you can always contact me for advise for the best available, and be assured, I am a non profit website and sell noting!

Also visit: “Classic Liners Vs the Modern Monsters of the Sea” Enter … “The Article.”

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What can we say about such delightful ships? I do know that I continue to receive many emails from people who have sailed on them, and they ask me, “But Mr. Goossens, why have you never written on these three important ships, you cover so many of the ships that have called on Australia and New Zealand, but somehow you have missed the ship that brought me and my family to this county, which was the best thing that ever happened in my whole life. The ship I remember still, although I was young, but she was so beautiful and we had a very good time. Because we sailed via South Africa, we did have some rough waters, but our family did not mind, being fisher people back home! … etc

Memories of the MS Australia departing Melbourne for Genoa

 

MS Australia, Oceania and Neptunia may have sailed into the sunset, but they will remain in our memories!

Although I retired quite some time ago and I did clearly state last year (2011) that I would not write any further features, well I obviously did do just one more as I felt that this trio was important to comple the wonderful ships that served Australia, However I do mean that this was “JUST ONE MORE for sadly THIS IS IT folks!

Best wishes, Reuben Goossens.

Ships Specifications:

 

Built at:                               Cantieri Reuniti dell’Adriatico Shipyards, Trieste, Italy.

Yards:                                 Ship - 1. 1758 – 2. 1759 – 3. 1760.

Tonnage:                             1. & 2. 12,839 GRT – 3. 12,838 GRT.

Tonnage - 1959:                   1. 13,226 GRT – 2. 13,226 GRT – 3. 13,225 GRT.

Length:                                160.9m / 528ft.

Breath:                                21.1m / 69.2ft.

Draught:                              8.16m / 26.8ft.

Engines:                              Sulzer Type Diesels by the builder - 14,000 BHP.

Screws:                                Two.

Speed:                                 18 knots.

Passengers as built:                      280 First Class. 120 Second Class. 392 Third class.

Passengers - 1959:                        136 First Class. 536 Tourist Class – 304 Tourist A & 232 Tourist B.

Crew:                                  236.

 

View the 1951 MS Australia Oceania Neptunia Deck Plan

Included there are sections of Deck Plans showing the new Tourist Class Lounge located forward on A Deck after 1958

As well as the changes on C Deck, as dormitories were reduced in size and in one case a whole section was changed to just cabins.

 

Other Lloyd Triestino ships on ssMaritime:

 

TN Galileo & Marconi - MV Africa & Europa & SS Toscana

 

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Commenced in the passenger Shipping Industry in May 1960  

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Photographs on ssmaritime and associate pages are by the author or from the author’s private collection. In addition there are some images that have been provided by Shipping Companies and private photographers or collectors. Credit is given to all contributors. However, there are some photographs provided to me without details regarding the photographer/owner concerned. I hereby invite if owners of these images would be so kind to make them-selves known to me - my email address is rg@ssmaritime.com - in order that due credit may be given. I know what it is like, I have seen a multitude of my own photographs on other sites, yet these individuals either refuse to provide credit or remove them when asked, knowing full well that there is no legal comeback when it comes to the net. However, let us show these charlatans up and do the right thing at all times and give credit where credit is due!

 

This notice covers all pages, although, and I have done my best to ensure that all photographs are duly credited and that this notice is displaced on each page, that is, when a page is updated!

 

 

 

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