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Please Note: All ssmaritime and my other related ssmaritime sites are 100% non-commercial and privately owned sites. Be assured that I am NOT associated with any cruise or shipping companies or travel/cruise agencies or any other organisations! The author has been in the passenger shipping industry since May 1960 and is now semi-retired, but continues to write article on classic liners and cruise ships in order to better to inform cruise and ship enthusiasts for their pleasure!

 

 

Special thank you: I have received a number of images from supporters of ssmaritime that are featured on this page and I am most grateful for these, especially Rick Danley from the USA who supplied all the brochure images on this page. There are other photographs on this page that have been provided by supporters but details of the photographers/owners are not known. If you are the photographer and wish to receive a full credit, please see the photo notes at the bottom of the page and email me.

 

Part One

RMS Media & RMS Parthia

The RMS Media and her twin sister RMS Parthia were originally designed and on order in 1945/46 as two big freighters for the Cunard affiliate the Brocklebank Line. However with World War II at an end, Cunard was ready to return to full passenger services across the Atlantic. Thus the two Queens were made ready for their normal Atlantic duties, however Cunard realised that new ships with a good cargo capacity were required for their Liverpool to New York service, thus Cunard took over these ships and redesigned them as all first class passenger cargo ships accommodating a mere 250 First Class passengers travelling in style and the ultimate in comfort. The ships also had six holds with an exceptional cargo capacity and this made this pair of ships unique in the Cunard fleet!

The Media was launched on December 12, 1947 and the Parthia on February 25, 1947. RMS Media was delivered to Cunard in August 1947 and being the very first new Trans Atlantic liner to be built after the war she departed on her maiden voyage from Liverpool to New York on August 20. The Parthia was completed and delivered in April 1948 and departed on her maiden voyage from Liverpool to New York on April 10.

This advertisement appeared in a New York Newspaper regarding RMS Parthia’s maiden arrival

Provided by Jason Dell of New York

 

RMS Media arrives in New York – from a brochure

From the author’s private collection 

Copy taken from a Cunard brochure: “TWO NEW POST-WAR LINERS - Described as ‘the ships of tomorrow,’ the Media and Parthia are the first new passenger liners to enter the fleet of Cunard White Star. They introduce to the North Atlantic a new type of liner, which will make a very wide appeal in that they have only one class of accommodation - First Class.”

RMS Parthia followed the Media eight months later

From the author’s private collection

 

 

Above & Below: Two postcards of the Drawing Room (above) and the Long Gallery (below) on the RMS Parthia

These images are both from prior the ships being refitted and upgraded in the early fifties.

From the author’s private collection

 

 

Both ships were relatively successful, however late in 1952 the Media was refitted, changes included having her promenade deck fully glass enclosed, but the major change was that she became the very first transatlantic liner to be fitted with “Deny-Brown fin stabilisers.” She was completed early in 1953 and soon enough these stabiliser fins proved that they greatly reduced the ships movement at sea, providing a far more comfortable crossing of the Atlantic. In fact, these stabilisers proved to be so successful that they were soon fitted to both the RMS Queen Mary and the Queen Elizabeth.

The Media is seen here prior to her 1953 refit - from a brochure

From the author’s private collection

Brochure copy: “These two new liners are each of 13,350 tons with a length of 535 feet, with a breadth of 70 feet.”

Both ships were relatively successful, but in 1953, the Media was overhauled and she became the first transatlantic liner to be fitted with Deny-Brown fin stabilisers. These fins greatly reduced the rolling at sea and provided a more comfortable crossing of the Atlantic. In fact, these stabilisers proved to be so successful; they were soon fitted to the Queen Mary and the Queen Elizabeth.

RMS Media is seen here after her refit with her promenade deck fully glass enclosed and fillet with stabilisers

From the author’s private collection

Photographs from a Cunard Brochure

The Main Lounge

Brochure copy: “The Lounge - a lofty, friendly room for entertainment from dancing and cinema shows to concerts and games on gala nights” 

The Cocktail Bar

Brochure copy: “The Cocktail Bar - an intimate rendezvous, gay in red and cream on the Promenade Deck.”

Long Gallery was the perfect place for morning and afternoon tea

Brochure copy: “Daylight pours into the Long Gallery through a group of large windows enhancing the room’s effect of cheerful informality.” 

The Drawing Room & Library was so typically English!

Brochure copy: “Quiet and restfulness are conveyed by the tasteful furnishings of this beautiful Drawing-room and Library.”

 

The Dinning Room was somewhat understated for a First Class Liner

Brochure copy: “Clever lighting and delicately toned furnishings create the atmosphere of a fashionable restaurant. The spacious air conditioned Dining Saloon spans the entire width of the ship” 

Cabins were spacious and well furnished

Brochure copy: “Staterooms are fitted for two and three passengers and are mostly outside rooms. Every room has a private bathroom or shower attached.” – “Wide, comfortable beds, cosy furnishings and attention to every detail for you comfort individualize each cabin.” 

 

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Both these ships became much sought after by many celebrities as they were smaller ships having an intimate and luxurious atmosphere and of course having only 250 passengers at the most. One much loved film star who used these ships frequently was Katharine Hepburn. 

Katharine Hepburn seen on board the RMS Parthia on boarding day in New York

 

Postcard of Cunard Line RMS Parthia

Postcard from the author’s private collection

 

RMS Media is seen here departing Liverpool

Photographer unknown - *See photo notes at bottom of page

These ships became popular due to their intimate atmosphere and the relaxed eight to ten day Atlantic crossings providing their passengers with a delightful time of shipboard life. Their lounges were comfortable and had all the comforts of the larger liners. Occasionally there would be calls to Norfolk in Virginia, Bermuda as well as Greenock in Scotland. When the Cunard berths in New York were full the ships would berth at across the Hudson at the Eighth Street Pier in Hoboken.

Left: The Media in New York; followed by Cunard’s Caronia, Queen Mary & Britannic (partially hidden)

Then the French Liner Liberty, America, Saturnia, and finally the Independence

From the author’s private collection

 

A superb colour photograph of the RMS Media

Photographer unknown - *See photo notes at bottom of page

By the early sixties, it became apparent, especially with low passenger loading’s, that Cunard had to dispose of both the Media and Parthia.

The RMS Parthia was purchased in 1962 by the New Zealand Shipping Company of London and she was renamed SS Remuera. She was purchased to replace the companies much loved but older Rangitata and Rangitiki, which were both soon sold to the breakers.

NZSC Postcard of the SS Remuera – later she received a slight dome to her funnel

From the author’s private collection

However, Remuera was sold two years later to the Eastern Australian Steam Ship Co of London and was renamed SS Aramac. She was placed on the Australia to Japan service. She made her first voyage on February 8 1965 from Melbourne and was registered at 13,619 GRT accommodating 350 passengers. In 1967/68 she was registered under the ownership of the Federal Steam Navigation Co, but continued the same service then and when she returned again under the EASS banner. She arrived in Kaohsiung Taiwan on November 22, 1969 at the breakers to be broken up, whist her older sister continued to sail on for many years yet!

A model of the RMS Media at the Liverpool Maritime Museum

Photograph taken by the author when visiting the UK in 2005

 

Specifications – 1: Media - 2: Parthia:

1: Media:

Builders: John Brown & Co, Clydebank – Yard 629

Launched: 12 December 1946

Tonnage: 13,345 GRT - 11,636 DWT

Engines: J Brown - Steam, D.R. geared turbines 15,000 SHP

2: Parthia:

Builders: Harland & Wolff, Belfast – Yard 1331

Launched: February 25, 1947

Tonnage: 13,362 GRT – 7,424 NET Tons

Engines: H&W Steam - D.R. geared turbines 15,000 SHP

Both Ships:

Length: 531ft – 162m

Width: 69.9ft – 21.3m

Draught: 26ft – 7.9m

Screws: twin

Service Speed: 18 knots

Passengers: 250/251 first class

Crew: 184

The RMS Media was sold in July 1961 for 740,000 (English Pounds) to the Italian Shipping Company “Compagnia Genovese d’Armamento S.p.A.,” or as they are known by their trading name; “Cogedar Line.” However, she continued to operate Cunard’s Trans-Atlantic service until September 30, and she was destored in Liverpool after her final voyage. The Media was then officially handed over on October 12 to Cogedar Line. The SS Media soon departed Liverpool bound for Genoa, Italy where she would receive what can only be called, the most comprehensive rebuilding programme is shipping history!

The reason the Media was obtained Cogedar was because they required the perfect ship to replace their aging liner MS Flaminia.

Continued in Part Two - See the Index below.

The sleek completely rebuilt Cogedar liner TS Flavia, one of the finest maritime reconstructions ever!

 

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RMS Media & the RMS Parthia, Remuera & Aramac - INDEX:

Part One: RMS Media & Parthia and the ship that would become the Cogedar liner, T/S Flavia.

 

Part One - B: RMS Parthia. This is a completely separate but related feature that covers the RMS Parthia that became the SS Remuera and later the SS Aramac.

Part One - C: SS Remuera Malcolm Walker sails on Remuera’s final voyage to the UK, before she became the Australia ship SS Aramac.

Cogedar’s SS Flavia

Part Two: T/S Flavia - History Page

Part Three: The Author’s Voyage in 1965 & Photo Album

Part Four: Passenger Photographs & Menus

Part Five: Cabin Plan

Part Six: Original Brochure

 

Other Cogedar Ships featured on ssMaritime:

1: MS Flaminia

2: MS Aurelia

 

Special thank you: I have received a number of images from supporters of ssmaritime that are featured on this page and I am most grateful for these, especially Rick Danley from the USA who supplied all the brochure images on this page. There are other photographs on this page that have been provided by supporters but details of the photographers/owners are not known. If you are the photographer and wish to receive a full credit, please see the photo notes at the bottom of the page and email me.

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Please Note: ssmaritime and associated sites are 100% non-commercial and the author seeks no funding or favours of any shape or form, never have and never will!

Photographs on ssmaritime and associate pages are by the author or from the author’s private collection. In addition there are some images that have been provided by Shipping Companies and private photographers or collectors. Credit is given to all contributors. However, there are some photographs provided to me without details regarding the photographer/owner concerned. I hereby invite if owners of these images would be so kind to make them-selves known to me (my email address may be found on www.ssmaritime.com only), in order that due credit may be given.

This notice covers all pages, although, and I have done my best to ensure that all photographs are duly credited and that this notice is displaced on each page, that is, when a page is updated!

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